The current child support system was largely put in place during the 1960s. During that time, single mothers in Florida and throughout the country asked the government for help providing for their children. To relieve the burden, the federal government asked fathers to provide those financial resources instead. However, some parents are asked to pay child support even if they have custody of their children.

In such a scenario, both parents generally provide equal support for their sons and daughters. The child support system is designed to ensure that parents are providing no more than what it actually costs to raise a child. According to the USDA, that is about $1,000 a month, which means each parent should pay a maximum of $500 per month. Instead, state guidelines base support amounts on a parent’s income as opposed to what it takes to adequately care for a child.

It is possible for parents to create their own child support arrangement. Doing so may result in a more flexible agreement that works better for the parents and the child. It may also save thousands of dollars in legal fees. Parents are encouraged to come to such an agreement with the help of a mediator and file a pro-se motion with the agreement.

Those who are in a child custody or child support dispute may benefit from seeking the advice of legal counsel. A legal professional may be able to review a case in an effort to create a reasonable outcome for a parent. An attorney may also help answer questions about paternity or any other concerns that a parent may have. Generally speaking, a child support order cannot be issued until it is determined who the child’s father is.