After a divorce in Florida or any other state, it is important that parents focus on their children as opposed to the behavior of their former spouses. As a general rule, it is never a good idea to threaten the child’s other parent because it can make it difficult to resolve a problem.

It may not be a good idea to threaten to report the child’s other parent to the authorities when temporary financial problems come up. This can create the perception that a custodial parent is more concerned with money as opposed to the welfare of the child. It can also create problems for the noncustodial parent that may be avoided when all parties are reasonable. By reporting a parent to the authorities, it could ruin that person’s credit and make it necessary to file for bankruptcy or sell assets.

By taking actions that prevent a parent from obtaining the means to support him or herself, it can be harder to care for the child. In some cases, taking drastic enforcement action is the sign of an angry person. However, by taking a step back, it may be possible to avoid taking drastic action in a moment of anger that could have an impact on a person’s life for many years to come.

While a child is entitled to adequate support, there may be many ways to provide it. Assuming that a noncustodial parent’s financial issues are temporary in nature, it may be possible to take steps such as returning payments. It may also be possible to roll a past due balance into future payments. Doing so could make it easier for a noncustodial parent to manage his or her finances while ensuring reasonable compliance with a current child support order. For a parent with permanent changes in finances, an attorney may help him or her request a child support modification.