When it comes to resolving child custody matters, divorcing Florida parents can generally come to any agreement that works for them. However, exceptions may be made if a parent is deemed unfit to have physical or legal custody of a son or daughter. Typically, parents will have joint custody or equitable parental rights. It is important to note that equal does not necessarily mean a 50/50 split.

Those who have legal custody of a child have the ability to make decisions about the child’s education and medical treatment among other items. Parents who have physical custody will be the ones who the child lives with the majority of the time. It may be possible for a parent to have one type of custody but not the other. Parents may choose to have serial custody of a child, in which a mother or father as custody for several months or years before giving it back to the other parent.

If a couple has multiple children, custody of those children may be split among the parents. For instance, a mother may have custody of her daughter while a father has custody of his son. However, going this route may be tricky as it could create instability in a child’s life. It could also separate a child from a potential source of comfort.

The best interests of the children are generally the top priority in any custody case. Therefore, parents may benefit from creating a parenting plan or other custody arrangement that takes their needs into account. An attorney may be able to help an individual obtain custody or other parental rights to a son or daughter. Generally speaking, both parents are entitled to remain in a child’s life after the end of their marriage.